Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Marseilles, the multicultural birthplace of the Le Pen rebellion, signpost of the rightful rejection of neoliberalism that sadly spawned Trump

 
(Marseilles' Vieux Port)

MARSEILLES, France – The 20-year-old salesman spoke in hip, nearly perfect English. American rock ‘n’ roll played in the background at his store near this city’s magnificent Vieux Port.

“There’s a lot of racism here against Muslims, Africans,” said the native of south central France.  “It’s not only our fault. It’s their fault, too. The kids are not educated by their parents.”

He tells me stories of once being insulted and harangued by Arabs after they invited him to their table at a café. He tells of a friend who was attacked by Arabs.

“I have a lot of hate in me. How can I not be a racist?”

It’s Frenchmen like this Marseilles salesman who are helping fuel the presidential campaign of Marine Le Pen, whose National Front party was born here in Marseilles. Yet, this is a city that has long prided itself on its immigrant tradition, one that dates at least back to biblical times when, legend has it, Mary Magdalene herself migrated here and preached in the streets.

My visit to Marseilles coincided with a long-brewing fixation on the great Marseilles crime novelist, Jean-Claude Izzo, whose books help explain--but not excuse--the young salesman’s rage and the rise of the National Front.

“The only future for Marseilles lay in rejecting its own history,” Izzo writes in Solea, the last book in his Marseilles Trilogy.

Pushing that rejection has been the European Union, which cares little about Marseilles but definitely wants the city’s port to serve the neoliberal interests of the global corporations that rule the world today. Recent years have seen shiny, high-rise development along Marseilles' outer port area, but poverty and unemployment remain higher here than in much of the rest of France.

For Izzo, it's an amoral world that aligns global economic interests with organized crime.

“`Organized crime is inextricably interwoven with the economic system,’” his crusading journalist Babette Bellini says in Solea. “`The opening up of world markets, the decline of the Welfare State, privatization, the deregulation of international finance and trade: all these things have tended to favor the growth of illegal activity as well as the internationalization of a rival criminal economy.’”

What Izzo’s fictional character here has done is issue an indictment against the neoliberal economic model that has nearly strangled countries as far afield as Greece and Argentina, upended the lives of millions upon millions of poor workers by forcing them to cross international borders in search of jobs, angered and threatened native workers with that huge immigration, and thus fueled the populist uprisings that gave us Donald Trump in the United States and Brexit in England.

In my most recent book, The Strangers Among Us: Tales of a Global Migrant Worker Movement (LabourStart, 2016), 10 writers from across the globe, including me, describe how workers are standing up to the world’s neoliberal rulers and asserting their rights. It’s a hard fight against very powerful forces, however.

Teachers in Argentina have been on strike for more than a month to protest President Mauricio Macri’s pro-corporate agenda and his gutting of the social fabric that has seen annual inflation approach 25 percent and individual buying power decline by 11 percent last year alone. Teachers want a pay raise that will enable them to survive in Macri’s Argentina. Here’s wishing them success!

This blog has followed developments in Argentina since I visited that country during the 2015 elections that gave Macri victory. He has done his best to undo the good work done by prior presidents Nestor Kirchner and Christina Fernández de Kirchner in the wake of the 2001 economic collapse. That collapse was created by 1990s deregulation, foreign indebtedness and pressure from that neoliberal citadel, the International Monetary Fund.

A hopeful sign on another front came last December when a U.S. judge allowed victims of the Chiquita Brands firm’s ties to a terrorist group in Colombia to sue the company. The judge’s ruling allows the victims to make their case in the United States rather than in Colombia, where the company has ceased its operations.

Again, Labor South has written previously about Chiquita’s disgusting, immoral behavior in Colombia and other Central and South American countries, its use of the cancer-causing pesticide Nemagon on its fruit trees in Latin America, its ties to the anti-leftist, anti-union terrorist group United Self-Defense Groups of Colombia (AUC).  Nearly 700 members of the largest banana labor union in Colombia were murdered between 1991 and 2006.

France’s contentious presidential election takes place in May, and a strong showing from Le Pen is expected. The country’s history of tolerance and its revolutionary legacy have been tested by persistent high unemployment, a growing divide between the rich and everyone else, the murders of 240 citizens at the hands of terrorists since 2015.

“What credibility do the failing elites have to give lessons on what does or does not work?” a political counselor in outgoing President François Hollande’s administration told Nation magazine.

It's like echoes of the Weimar Republic amid the growing clamor of pitchforks and shouting voices outside the castle walls!

Hollande is ostensibly a socialist, but he’s one with a neoliberal capitalistic bent. In other words, he’s cut from the same cloth as former British labor leader and prime minister Tony Blair and U.S. Democratic wunderkinder Bill and Hillary Clinton, Big Money, elite-loving wolves in bleating-heart sheep’s clothing!

Whether France, England or the United States, the working class has no party representing its interests, and thus its turn to the right. British voters rejected the European Union because the EU has evolved into a neoliberal fortress like the IMC and World Bank, preaching austerity to average folks and tax benefits and cushy trade policies to corporate heads and their political cronies. Le Pen isn’t anti-government like Donald Trump, but she has capitalized on anti-immigrant resentment, a resentment that blames immigrants rather than the global power brokers who helped create mass immigration.

In the United States, workers struggle to make sense of their lives today.  Their biggest battle, as always, is with fear. That’s why workers at the Boeing plant in North Charleston, S. C., voted down a union earlier this year. It’s also the biggest obstacle pro-union workers face at the giant Nissan plant in Canton, Mississippi, in their effort to bring in the United Auto Workers to represent them.

Unsuccessful presidential candidate Bernie Sanders spoke eloquently to those workers in Canton last month, the only major politician to do so at their “March on Mississippi”. “All of our people deserve decent wages and decent benefits,” Sanders told them. “What this struggle is about is decency.”

Meanwhile, back in Washington, D.C., the Clinton machine still rules the Democratic Party and the Democratic National Committee.

Clinton-friendly Tom Perez won the DNC chairmanship over pro-Sanders candidate Keith Ellison and despite some initial gestures toward the Sanders camp showed his true colors by ignoring Democrat populist James Thompson’s strong congressional bid in Kansas while showering $8 million onto the campaign of Clintonite Jon Ossoff’s congressional campaign in Georgia.

Ossoff endorsed Hillary Clinton in last year’s primary, plus he studied at Georgetown University and the London School of Economics, and thus makes a nice fit for the meritocracy the Clinton machine has long envisioned not only for the party but the nation.

As for the rest of us, the Great Unwashed out there, well, we can just simply eat cake, as one famous French meritocrat from the past once told us.

Monday, April 10, 2017

Bill Minor, a courageous journalist who kept his "eyes on Mississippi" for 70 years

 
(Bill Minor with friends celebrating his 90th birthday at a party in Jackson, Mississippi, a few years ago)

OXFORD, Miss. – Over the intercom in the Mississippi Capitol pressroom in Jackson one day back in 1984, a House member harangued his colleagues on the floor over a stalled bill. “When are we ever going to enter the 20th century?” the politician cried.

“Never!” our mentor and senior Capitol press corps member, Bill Minor, shouted into the wall speaker.

We younger reporters all got a good laugh out of that but perhaps a little apprehension, too. Minor had been covering Mississippi since 1947. Maybe he wasn’t joking.

That memory came back to me late last month when I learned of Bill Minor’s death at the age of 93. He was indeed a mentor, a comrade-in-arms, a hero to me then and now. I began my journalistic journey in Mississippi in late 1981 around the same time Minor published the farewell edition of his amazing alternative newspaper, The Capital Reporter. I still have a treasured copy of that edition.

“The Ten Most Powerful: Who are the movers and shakers in Jackson?” was the top-of-the-fold headline. In an editorial inside, Bill wrote of the paper’s unabashed “sympathetic treatment of the underdog” and his “hope that there will be others to take up the slack in keeping the pressure on public officials” as well as “those in the private sector who enjoy the public trust.”

Bill wrote with authority. He had been a frontlines warrior ever since his first big story in the state, the funeral for Mississippi’s ranting, racist U.S. Senator Theodore Bilbo. From there he had gone on to cover practically every major event in the state’s bloody civil rights-era history. As a reporter for the New Orleans Times-Picayune, Capital Reporter editor, and later statewide syndicated columnist, he suffered the slings and arrows—death threats, cross burnings, smashed windows, even a stolen typesetting machine.

A compelling collection of Bill's columns and writings appeared in 2001 under the title Eyes on Mississippi: A Fifty-Year Chronicle of Change (J Prichard Morris Books).

I was proud to be part of a new generation of journalists in Mississippi taking up his challenge, and I kept in close touch with Bill over the years to see how we were doing. Not always so good, he would sometimes lament.

Too much of “our journalism is unfortunately go along, get along,” he told an audience of students and professors at the University of Mississippi in 2004. “To be a journalist is to be prepared to take a risk. Newspapers are the closest to my heart. … I see us engaged in an endless war. This is not just a cozy little political sideshow, it is serious business. … Journalists are still the first eyes and ears of the nation, but it takes reporters out there on the ground. There’s no substitute for reporters on the ground.”

He didn’t let the professors in the audience off the hook either. He recalled one who lost his job for exercising “academic freedom” and standing up for civil rights in the 1960s, former Ole Miss history professor James Silver. “James Silver, a great old professor here back in the day any professor who spoke up against the system was run out of the state.”

 I was fortunate to come to Mississippi at a time when a lot of the legends were still alive. I once interviewed James Silver and also civil rights crusader and journalist Hazel Brannon Smith. I’ll never forget talking with another legend from that era, reporter Homer Bigart, and I actually worked for the great Claude Sitton in my native North Carolina before coming here.

However, none of them impressed me more than Bill Minor, a Louisiana native who could have easily left Mississippi for a glorious career in Washington, D.C., but instead chose to stay.

“I used to yearn for Bill to come to Washington and take on such sacred cows as Russell Long and Jim Eastland,” New York Times and former Mississippi newspaper and wire reporter John Herbers once wrote. “But he may have succeeded better, as a reporter, by staying in Mississippi. I know of no other state that has been transformed as much. And as the eyes and ears for many outside the state, as well as in, he may have contributed more to that transformation than any other journalist.”

Over the past years Bill and I would catch up on life and politics with a phone call every few weeks or at an occasional gathering. I loved those conversations, which usually included a good bit of grousing over the politics of the day and the fact that dammit, Mississippi was still trying “to enter the 20th century” more than a decade into the 21st! Then we’d have a good laugh and talk about the latest hell he had given a deserving politician.

This column appeared recently in the Jackson Free Press in Jackson, Mississippi.

Monday, March 27, 2017

Labor South reading roundup - The dark side of "Detroit South" and still waiting on the Russia-2016 presidential election smoking gun

A couple of interesting articles appeared recently that are worth passing along (apologies if you can't access these links here. I'll keep trying, but you may just have to copy and paste to access):

The dark side of "Detroit South"

Peter Waldman's report, "Inside Alabama's Auto Jobs Boom: Cheap Wages, Little Training, Crushed Limbs", in Bloomberg puts the lie to the glorified tales about "Detroit South" that politicians and chambers of commerce want to tell us. A worthy read given the major union campaign taking place at the giant Nissan plant in Canton, Miss.

See: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2017-03-23/inside-alabama-s-auto-jobs-boom-cheap-wages-little-training-crushed-limbs


Now back to Russia and the 2016 presidential campaign

Interesting points by Stephen Cohen in Nation magazine recently that challenge MSNBC's constant drumbeat since its candidate lost. I don't like Trump, and I don't like Putin. However, I'm still waiting on the smoking gun regarding Russian hacking. Is it going to come? What I do know unequivocally is that the DNC actively worked to undermine Bernie Sanders' campaign, and that was reprehensible and I'm not forgetting it.

See:https://www.thenation.com/article/why-we-must-oppose-the-kremlin-baiting-against-trump/


Sunday, March 5, 2017

Bernie Sanders to Nissan workers in Mississippi: "The eyes of the country and the eyes of the world are on you!"

 
(Bernie Sanders in Canton, Miss., Saturday)

CANTON, Miss. - U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont told an estimated crowd of 3,000 Saturday that “the eyes of the country and the eyes of the world” are on Mississippi and the workers at Nissan’s giant plant here.

“All of our people deserve decent wages and decent benefits,” Sanders told the cheering crowd. “What this struggle is about is a struggle for decency.  … One worker has zero power, but when workers stand together, you have power.”

Sanders was one of several prominent speakers at the “March on Mississippi” in Canton Saturday, arguably the largest labor rally in the state’s history.  The crowd included labor leaders from France and Brazil, United Mine Workers members, and students from the University of Mississippi, Jackson State University, and Tougaloo College.

(To the right, Sanders in Canton talking about inequality in the United States. My apologies if the video cannot be accessed!)

They came to champion the right of the more than 5,000 workers at the mile-long Nissan plant in Canton to have a free, intimidation-free election to decide whether they want to join the United Auto Workers. Union leaders, local activists and workers have long complained of harassment against pro-union workers, the hiring of temporary workers at less wages and fewer benefits, unsafe working conditions, and the lack of a voice in company decisions on everything from working hours to the speed allowed on the assembly line.

Nissan employee Derick Whiting died recently after passing out at the worksite. Workers said they were forced to continue at the assembly line, a charge Nissan officials have denied. The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration recently fined Nissan more than $20,000 for safety violations at the plant.

"They said we lied about what happened," 14-year veteran Nissan worker Travis Parks told the crowd. "I saw him lying on the floor."

Sanders said a company reporting more than $6 billion in profits and that pays its CEO $9 million a year could do better by its employees. “Share some of that wealth! … Our job is to tell corporate America they cannot have it all. What justice is about is allowing the freedom to workers to vote their conscience. If you stand up to the power of corporations in Mississippi, it’s a huge vote of confidence to the nation.”

UAW President Dennis Williams also told the crowd of the importance of what happens in Canton to the nation. “This is about you raising your fist. It’s about solidarity, empowering people, a movement. The only path to have economic justice is through collective bargaining.”

Sierra Club President Aaron Mair agreed. “If organized labor fails here, we all fail. You cannot make America great again on the back of degraded labor.”

The organizing campaign in Canton has been underway for 12 years now, beginning with a small group of UAW organizers, local activists, workers and clergy. Labor South was there at the beginning, attending those early meetings as the sole media representative for a long time.

Nissan workers earn comparatively good wages for blue-collar workers in Mississippi. However, many have complained of going years without pay raises, poor working conditions, arbitrary rules changes, and having to endure anti-union videos and other pressures against joining a union.

Friday, March 3, 2017

Actor Danny Glover: Come to Saturday, March 4, rally in Canton, Miss., to support Nissan workers' right to organize

 
(Actor Danny Glover speaking to students at the University of Mississippi)

OXFORD, Miss. – I’ll never forget Danny Glover as the drifter Moze in the 1984 film Places in the Heart. It was a Depression-era story of a widowed mother in the South trying to keep her children and save her farm with the help of Moze and a blind war veteran.

I loved that story because it reminded me of my grandmother, Minnie “Mama” Atkins, herself a rural Southern widow during the Great Depression who had to fend off local authorities wanting her to give up her four small children.

Later I saw Glover as Joshua Deets in the 1989 television series Lonesome Dove. He was one of my favorites among the large cast of characters in that 19th century cattle drive tale that my family watched religiously, episode after episode.

I never imagined I would eventually get to meet Glover, not so much as an actor but as a champion of working folks and their rights to organize and have some control over their lives at the workplace.

Glover was here in Oxford recently to rally students and citizens to come to Canton, Mississippi, March 4 and join U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders in the “March on Mississippi” against voter suppression and for workers’ rights, particularly in the ongoing union organizing effort at the giant Nissan plant in Canton.

He told the crowd of more than 100 a story about legendary actor, singer and human rights activist Paul Robeson, who suffered the blacklist and widespread scorn because of his political advocacy. Asked if he regretted anything in his life, Robeson said, “`There’s not one thing I’d change in my life. It’s about the journey.’”

Young people today would do well to think about their own journey in life, said Glover, 70, whose labor advocacy and human rights efforts have earned him an international reputation. They need to listen to the stories of those around them, particularly the shared humanity of those who work hard and play by the rules yet whose rights as humans are constricted by the powerful.

“I think about the journey. Over 50 years ago as a student, I didn’t know where that journey was going to take me. … You have an opportunity to look at the stories and make them part of your story. “

In Canton, thousands of men and women work at an automobile plant that was built with the help of $1.4 billion in tax breaks and other incentives provided by the poorest state in America. While they earn good wages in comparison to other Mississippians, they live in fear that they’ll lose their jobs due to injuries in a workplace recently fined $20,000 by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration for poor safety conditions.

They see their jobs increasingly threatened by management’s hiring of temporary workers who receive fewer benefits and lower wages.

They worry that reasons will be found to get rid of them if they show support for joining a union despite federal laws that prohibit such intimidation by management.  For more than a decade, a community-wide effort has been underway to get Nissan to desist in the kind of voter suppression that makes a free union election impossible.

“The South has changed,” said Glover, a native of San Francisco whose family came from Georgia. “The South I heard about in 1964, it’s not the same South. The Civil Rights Movement opened up the South.”

Yet, he said, the fight for workers’ rights in the South continues.

“The rights of workers have been curtailed, stepped upon,” he said, adding that those rights will continue to be curtailed “without a union, a place where workers can go to collectively bargain, to have a conversation.”

Glover, who also would participate in the 14th Annual Oxford Film Festival while in town, said it was his first trip to Oxford, but he has come to Mississippi several times over the years to bring attention to the cause of the Nissan workers in Canton, 80 percent of whom are African American.

“When I see people win, they stand a little taller,” he told Nissan workers during a visit in 2012.  “I want people to win. People lifting themselves up. I’m always blown away by that.”

Glover told them that he came from a union family. His parents were postal workers who were also active in the Civil Rights Movement. “I had health care all my life because the union created the situation where I could have health care.”

He also told the workers something that was echoed during his more recent visit to Oxford. “You are all part of a much larger legacy,” he said. “Your story is going to resonate.”

This column also appeared in the Jackson Free Press in Jackson, Mississippi.

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Feeling politically homeless with Trump's cabinet "deplorables" and a Democratic Party in disarray / Finding hope in those on the front lines

 
OXFORD, Miss. – It’s hard not to feel a little politically homeless these days. I’m thinking of that old folk song, “Sometimes I feel like a motherless child.”

I see the cabinet choices of President Trump, and if there ever was a group of “deplorables”, this is it: A Treasury nominee whose nickname is “Foreclosure King”; a Labor nominee who prefers robots to workers because they don’t want vacations or pay raises; a Commerce nominee who sees the “1 Percent” as victims and who helped transfer the U.S. textile industry to Asia.

Then I see this same president sign an executive order withdrawing from the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement, an Obama-supported secret deal that would have allowed private corporations to sue nations that pass environment or worker-friendly laws inhibiting their profits. Trump has also given notice that he may be targeting NAFTA, a similar bad deal for workers.

Those are good, long-overdue actions that neo-liberal, corporate friendly Democrats like Bill and Hillary Clinton would have never done despite candidate Hillary’s shallow assurance she had switched from supporter to critic of TPP.

On the Democratic Party side, I see a party truly in shambles with devastating losses not only in Washington, D.C., but also in legislative halls and governor’s mansions across the nation. A time for some good soul-searching and change in leadership and direction, right? Not so fast. A lot of the same old faces are still around, including 76-year-old U.S. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi.

Then there’s U.S. Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., in the news recently after suffering a “Twitter Attack” from the president, who essentially told Lewis to mind the business of his district instead of telling everybody Trump was not a “legitimate president.”

Lewis is a bona fide civil rights hero, but let’s face it. He started that fight with Trump. Furthermore, Lewis diminished himself in my view during the campaign primaries when he questioned Bernie Sanders’ civil rights credentials. Sanders was an activist in Chicago who was even arrested for his pro-civil rights protests. Where was Lewis’ preferred candidate, Hillary Clinton, back in those days? Besides, one warrior doesn’t attack a fellow warrior for political expediency.

I know Democrats who applauded U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., when he sanctimoniously went after Trump’s Secretary of State nominee, Rex Tillerson, during confirmation hearings for not declaring Russian President Vladimir Putin a “war criminal”. This is the same Marco Rubio who hired “The Vulture”, hedge fund billionaire Paul Singer, as his campaign finance chairman during the presidential election. Singer successfully soaked financially strapped Argentina for nearly $5 billion on a $50 million investment, helping to spiral that country into economic chaos.

By the way, for all his grandstanding, Rubio ended up supporting Tillerson’s nomination.

Here in Mississippi, the Republican takeover in Washington, D.C., has emboldened state GOP leaders like Gov. Phil Bryant and his kindred conservatives in the Legislature. These so-called fiscal conservatives—that description becomes a joke when the issue is corporate largesse—continue to squeeze the state budget, underfunding roads and highways, the state trauma care system.

Now Bryant says it’s time for the state to consider instituting a lottery, a way to raise needed funds without raising taxes. It’s a lot of baloney. As with casinos, a state lottery would just provide another excuse for lawmakers to cut taxes on corporations and the rich while letting the rest of us poor suckers spend our money in the hope of getting the lucky number that will make us rich!

The real hope out there are the activists on the front lines working hard for the people, not themselves or their friends, activists like Bill Chandler and his team at the Mississippi Immigrants Rights Alliance. They’ll be fighting at least a half-dozen or more anti-immigrant bills this legislative session that echo Trump’s anti-immigrant rants.

These people-serving activists include the United Auto Workers and students at Tougaloo College, Jackson State University, and the University of Mississippi who’ll be leading the “March on Mississippi” March 4 in Canton to protest voter suppression efforts and the failure of Nissan to provide an intimidation-free atmosphere for union-sympathetic workers at its Canton plant.

In fact, activists as far away as Nashville, Atlanta and Greensboro, N.C., were already on the streets in January protesting the conditions at the Nissan plant. Of course, protesters of all stripes have been taking to the streets ever since Trump’s election, pledging their support for women’s rights and other issues.

What the populist revolts of both Trump’s campaign and the Bernie Sanders campaign in the Democratic Party showed was a deep revulsion against the political establishment. People indeed do want their country back. Like me, a lot of them feel kind of homeless these days, something the political establishment has rarely felt.



Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Still no proof of Russian email hacking but plenty proof of DNC skullduggery

 
 (Vladimir Putin)

OXFORD, Miss. – Back in the summer of 1992, just months after the failed coup that led to the fall of communism and Boris Yeltsin’s rise to leadership in a new post-Soviet Russia, I traveled with my late wife Marilyn to Moscow and met Roman Fiodorov.

Fiodorov was our bespectacled, sharp-witted guide through the ancient churches and towers of the Kremlin. He liked to tell a good-if-sometimes-grim joke as he regaled us with tales of Ivan the Terrible and Rasputin.

“Ah, you Americans,” he said at one point. “Two people get hurt in a car accident, and it’s front-page news. Here in Russia, hundreds get sent off to Siberia, and it’s not even in the newspaper.”

 The Cold War between the United States and Russia was finally thawing. Americans and Russians could share in a little self-deprecating humor. The candle-lit, Icon-filled Orthodox churches in Moscow were filling with people able to show their faith and belief openly and without fear.

Today, as the cold, wintry drifts of January bring the new Trump Era in America into view, I wonder at the Cold War nostalgia that the 2016 presidential election seems to have unearthed.

Russian President Vladimir Putin wants President-elect Donald Trump to be his personal “lap dog,” charges John Podesta, who chaired Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton’s failed campaign. He’s echoing similar comments by New York Times writer Nicholas Kristof.

Of course, Podesta is referring to alleged Russian hacks into the Democratic National Committee’s email system that revealed how the DNC secretly worked to scuttle the primary campaign of Clinton’s chief Democratic rival, Bernie Sanders.

Disgraced former DNC Interim Chair and television commentator Donna Brazile, who resigned her post after revelations that she slipped questions to primary candidate Clinton to give her an edge during televised debates, now calls herself “one of the main victims of the Russian attacks.”

Both Democrats and Republicans are planning further investigation into the matter. The CIA, FBI and NSA have publicly concluded that Putin and Russia were the culprits. President Obama ousted 35 Russian diplomats to show his anger. U.S. Sen. John McCain, the Arizona Republican who would have put Sarah Palin a heartbeat away from the presidency in 2008, has called Russia’s alleged hacking “an act of war.”

Only one problem threatens to undermine this new Cold War mentality: Not the CIA or anyone else has yet produced any concrete evidence that Putin or the Russians indeed did the alleged hacking. Even the agencies’ much-ballyhooed report released to the public after their meeting with Trump this month included no specific evidence. Julian Assange, whose WikiLeaks published the emails, says that the Russians were not his organization’s source. An Assange  associate says no hacking even took place, that “an insider”, not a Russian, provided WikiLeaks with the information.

The rising Cold War-like hysteria reached ridiculous proportions in late December when it was determined that the supposed hacking by Russians into the state of Vermont’s electronic grid—an offense that prompted Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin, a Democrat, to call Putin “one of the world’s leading thugs”—never happened. The Washington Post reported a story that had no foundation!
  
What baffles me about the controversy over the leaked emails—regardless of their source—is that it shows Trump was partially right when he claimed the system was “rigged” during the campaign. He was wrong in believing it was rigged against him. The system was actually rigged against Bernie Sanders and any other challenger to the Clinton Machine within the Democratic Party.

Certainly neither Russia nor any other nation should be interfering with the American political process. Is Putin happy Trump won? Sure he is. Candidate Clinton talked about imposing a no-fly zone over Syria, something that likely would have put the United States in a direct military confrontation with Russia.

Still, whoever gave WikiLeaks that information did the American public a service. Voters needed to know that Democratic Party leaders were putting the lie to their party’s name by trying to make sure they, and not the people, got to choose who the general election candidate would be.

Putin is no angel, far from it, and a sadness continues to underlie Roman Fiodorov’s joke because there’s likely still truth to it.

When Trump takes office this month, he’ll bring with him people like his choice for secretary of state, Exxon Mobile Chief Executive Rex W. Tillerson, a businessman who has worked closely with Putin and the Russians for years. What that portends for the environment as well as for relations with China, NATO and Europe is uncertain and even unsettling, like many of Trump’s cabinet choices.

Still, that doesn’t take the stink off the Democratic Party’s near self-destruction in the 2016 election, where its loss of the White House only compounds its loss of Congress, plus 900 legislative seats and two-thirds of governors’ offices over the past eight years.

The current leaked email controversy actually reeks of a “lap dog” mainstream media more than willing to promote an inside campaign to shift attention away from Democratic Party skullduggery to Russia and Vladimir Putin.

And it’s also hypocrisy. Consider the United States’ long history of mixing itself into the elections of other sovereign nations—from Iran to South Vietnam to Chile to Nicaragua to Libya to Honduras to the Ukraine, where a democratically elected president was ousted with U.S. complicity in 2014 with no regard whatsoever how neighboring Russia might feel about that situation.

“Systems are different, but people are the same, “ Roman Fiodorov told us Americans back in 1992. “People just want a (normal) life.”

He was right, and the fact that “systems” and politics often make that difficult is no joke.